Ginger

Ginger

TIPS ON FRESH GINGER

The following are some tips I’ve collected:

Many people have used ginger to treat colitis, nausea, gas, indigestion, bowel disorders, morning sickness, motion sickness, vomiting, congestion, fever, and headaches. The below information was taken from http://www.gingerpeople.com/index.html

Purchasing Fresh Ginger
When shopping for fresh ginger, look for pieces with a plump, smooth, somewhat shiny skin. If it’s wrinkled or cracked, the ginger is drying and past its prime. Never substitute dried ground ginger for fresh. It simply doesn’t taste the same.

Storing Fresh Ginger
Fresh ginger will get moldy in the refrigerator. It’s best to store it at room temperature much like you would potatoes. Ginger will eventually sprout little buds. These are considered a pungent delicacy in many parts of Asia. Just pinch them off and enjoy. Some people freeze their ginger, although we don’t recommend it as it alters the flavor. Others store their fresh ginger in dry sherry or Madeira in the refrigerator for up to 3 months. The ginger will impart some of its flavor to the wine, but that’s a minor disadvantage when weighed against having peeled ginger ready and waiting to be used. The ginger-flavored wine can be used in stir-fry dishes, salad dressings, sauces, etc.

Preparing Fresh Ginger
To prepare fresh ginger, peel only the skin of this knobby-looking rhizome (an under-ground stem). Use either a vegetable peeler or sharp knife. One ginger fan suggests scraping off the skin with an ordinary spoon. “It works great and it seems like you don’t lose so much of the good stuff.” Depending upon your recipe, fresh ginger may be sliced, diced, minced, grated, shredded or juiced.

Cooking with Ginger
Unlike any other flavor, ginger is unlimited in its culinary uses. From the fieriest of stir-fries to the sweetest of ice creams, ginger has the ability to cross over from savory to sweet. Rather than tinker with tried-and-true Asian recipes, seek other culinary marriages for ginger. Experiment with a small amount of fresh, pickled or candied ginger in a recipe. Remember that a little ginger goes a long way. As you go, increase the amount of ginger to suit your personal tastes. Add ginger to soups, stocks, salads, vegetables, marinades, sauces and desserts.

FRESH GINGER can also be ‘pressed’ in our Garlic Press. Many people have used ginger to treat colitis, nausea, gas, indigestion, bowel disorders, morning sickness, motion sickness, vomiting, congestion, fever and headaches!! When shopping for fresh ginger, look for pieces with a plump, smooth, somewhat shiny skin. If its wrinkled or cracked, the ginger is drying and past its prime. Never substitute dried ground ginger for fresh. It DOES NOT taste the same. Additional facts about FRESH GINGER: Fresh ginger will get moldy in the refrigerator. Store it at room temperature like you would potatoes. It will eventually sprout little buds, which are considered a pungent delicacy in parts of Asia. Just pinch them off and enjoy! It’s not recommended to freeze ginger as it alters the flavor. Some people store it peeled in dry sherry or Madeira in the refrigerator for up to 3 months. The ginger will release some of its flavor to the wine, but that’s a minor disadvantage when weighed against having peeled ginger ready and waiting to use. The ginger-flavored wine can be used in stir-fry dishes, salad dressings, sauces, etc. To prepare fresh ginger, peel only the skin of this knobby-looking rhizome (an under-ground stem). Use either a vegetable peeler or sharp knife. It can then be sliced, diced, minced, pressed, grated, shredded or juiced. Cooking with Ginger: Ginger is unlimited in its culinary uses from the fieriest of stir-fries to the sweetest of ice creams, it has the ability to cross over from savory to sweet. Experiment with a small amount of fresh, pickled or candied ginger in a recipe. A little ginger goes a long way. As you go, increase the amount to suit your personal tastes. Add ginger to soups, stocks, salads, vegetables, marinades, sauces and desserts. References: www.gingerpeople.com